Why Haven’t There Been More Unicorn Mergers

[vc_row row_type=”row” use_row_as_full_screen_section=”no” type=”grid” angled_section=”no” text_align=”left” background_image_as_pattern=”without_pattern” css_animation=”” css=”.vc_custom_1463146108811{padding-bottom: 20px !important;}”][vc_column offset=”vc_col-lg-offset-1 vc_col-lg-10 vc_col-md-offset-1 vc_col-md-10″][vc_column_text][dropcaps type=’normal’ font_size=’45’ color=’#191919′ background_color=” border_color=”]H[/dropcaps]ow did they balance being so funny and being such respected artists?” This question was recently posed by a visitor in reference to Peter Fischli David Weiss: How to Work Better, a retrospective of the Swiss duo’s thirty-three-year collaborative career currently on view at the Guggenheim. The visitor’s question prompted by Suddenly This Overview (1981–), a series of clay sculptures that form a tongue-in-cheek index of human history—gets to the heart of the duo’s artistic and philosophical investigation of what they called “popular opposites.” The term refers to the supposedly inherent dichotomies we draw between things such as art and kitsch, work and leisure, and other such dualities. How to Work Better, a retrospective of the Swiss duo’s thirty-three-year collaborative career currently on view at the Guggenheim. The visitor’s question prompted by Suddenly This Overview (1981–), a series of clay sculptures that form a tongue-in-cheek index of human history—gets to the heart of the duo’s artistic and philosophical investigation of what they called “popular opposites.” The term refers to the supposedly inherent dichotomies we draw between things such as art and kitsch, work and leisure, and other such dualities.[/vc_column_text][/vc_column][/vc_row][vc_row row_type=”row” use_row_as_full_screen_section=”no” type=”grid” angled_section=”no” text_align=”left” background_image_as_pattern=”without_pattern” css_animation=”” css=”.vc_custom_1463146163185{padding-top: 50px !important;padding-bottom: 44px !important;}”][vc_column width=”1/3″][vc_single_image image=”63″ img_size=”full” qode_css_animation=””][vc_separator type=”transparent” thickness=”0″ up=”0″ down=”30″][/vc_column][vc_column width=”1/3″][vc_single_image image=”64″ img_size=”full” qode_css_animation=””][vc_separator type=”transparent” thickness=”0″ up=”0″ down=”30″][/vc_column][vc_column width=”1/3″][vc_single_image image=”65″ img_size=”full” qode_css_animation=””][vc_separator type=”transparent” thickness=”0″ up=”0″ down=”30″][/vc_column][/vc_row][vc_row row_type=”row” use_row_as_full_screen_section=”no” type=”grid” angled_section=”no” text_align=”left” background_image_as_pattern=”without_pattern” css_animation=”” css=”.vc_custom_1463146184322{padding-bottom: 70px !important;}”][vc_column offset=”vc_col-lg-offset-1 vc_col-lg-10 vc_col-md-offset-1 vc_col-md-10″][vc_column_text]How to Work Better, a retrospective of the Swiss duo’s thirty-three-year collaborative career currently on view at the Guggenheim. The visitor’s question prompted by Suddenly This Overview (1981–), a series of clay sculptures that form a tongue-in-cheek index of human history—gets to the heart of the duo’s artistic and philosophical investigation of what they called “popular opposites.” The term refers to the supposedly inherent dichotomies we draw between things such as art and kitsch, work and leisure, and other such dualities. How to Work Better, a retrospective of the Swiss duo’s thirty-three-year collaborative career currently on view at the Guggenheim. The visitor’s question prompted by Suddenly This Overview (1981–), a series of clay sculptures that form a tongue-in-cheek index of human history—gets to the heart of the duo’s artistic and philosophical investigation of what they called “popular opposites.” The term refers to the supposedly inherent dichotomies we draw between things such as art and kitsch, work and leisure, and other such dualities.

The term refers to the supposedly inherent dichotomies we draw between things such as art and kitsch, work and leisure, and other such dualities. How to Work Better, a retrospective of the Swiss duo’s thirty-three-year collaborative career currently on view at the Guggenheim. The visitor’s question prompted by Suddenly This Overview (1981–), a series of clay sculptures that form a tongue-in-cheek index of human history.[/vc_column_text][/vc_column][/vc_row][vc_row row_type=”parallax” parallax_content_width=”in_grid” text_align=”center” background_image=”66″ full_screen_section_height=”no”][vc_column][vc_separator type=”transparent” thickness=”0″ up=”0″ down=”177″][icons icon_pack=”font_elegant” fe_icon=”icon_quotations” size=”fa-lg” type=”square” custom_size=”45″ custom_shape_size=”40″ border_radius=”100″ border=”yes” target=”_self” icon_color=”#ffffff” icon_hover_color=”#141212″ background_color=”rgba(255,255,255,0.01)” hover_background_color=”#ffffff” border_color=”#ffffff” border_width=”1″][vc_separator type=”transparent” thickness=”0″ up=”0″ down=”35″][vc_column_text]

He gets to the heart of the duo’s artistic and philosophical investigation in art forms.

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– Robert Anakis

[/vc_column_text][vc_separator type=”transparent” thickness=”0″ up=”0″ down=”174″][/vc_column][/vc_row][vc_row row_type=”row” use_row_as_full_screen_section=”no” type=”grid” angled_section=”no” text_align=”left” background_image_as_pattern=”without_pattern” css_animation=”” css=”.vc_custom_1463146237211{padding-top: 74px !important;}”][vc_column offset=”vc_col-lg-offset-1 vc_col-lg-10 vc_col-md-offset-1 vc_col-md-10″][vc_column_text]How to Work Better, a retrospective of the Swiss duo’s thirty-three-year collaborative career currently on view at the Guggenheim. The visitor’s question prompted by Suddenly This Overview (1981–), a series of clay sculptures that form a tongue-in-cheek index of human history—gets to the heart of the duo’s artistic and philosophical investigation of what they called “popular opposites.” The term refers to the supposedly inherent dichotomies we draw between things such as art and kitsch, work and leisure, and other such dualities. How to Work Better, a retrospective of the Swiss duo’s thirty-three-year collaborative career currently on view at the Guggenheim. The visitor’s question prompted by Suddenly This Overview (1981–), a series of clay sculptures that form a tongue-in-cheek index of human history—gets to the heart of the duo’s artistic and philosophical investigation of what they called “popular opposites.” The term refers to the supposedly inherent dichotomies we draw between things such as art and kitsch, work and leisure, and other such dualities.

The term refers to the supposedly inherent dichotomies we draw between things such as art and kitsch, work and leisure, and other such dualities. How to Work Better, a retrospective of the Swiss duo’s thirty-three-year collaborative career currently on view at the Guggenheim. The visitor’s question prompted by Suddenly This Overview (1981–), a series of clay sculptures that form a tongue-in-cheek index of human history.[/vc_column_text][/vc_column][/vc_row]

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3 Comments

  1. Robert Nordstrom

    13 May 2016 at 13 h 09 min

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  3. Robert Nordstrom

    13 May 2016 at 13 h 18 min

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